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Happy Birthday Marie! July 17, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, History, Inspiration, Leadership, Manthey Life Mosaic, Nursing Peer Support Network, Nursing Salons, Professional Practice, Thought for today, Values.
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This is Claire talking (Marie’s daughter, and co-editor of this site), checking in with you on this celebratory day!

I know Marie values each and every one of you, and loves hearing from you and having conversations with you – whether in person, in various professional / civic roles, on social media, here on the blog.

And so today on her birthday, I wanted to formally welcome you all back to this blog.

In the last few months, we’ve started to get active again — exploring various kinds of posts with a multitude of topics including Nursing: it’s history, challenges, future, best practices, values & inspiration etc.. as well as CHCM activities, Marie’s life (Mosaic), Nursing Salons, the Nursing Peer Support Network, activities at the University of MN School of Nursing, and so on.

If you have a moment today, would love to hear any preferences from you about types of content, questions you have for Marie, how often you’d like us to post, how you’d like to hear about posts, and anything else to make this blog a win-win.

We never know how long any of us have here. Marie is the epitome of taking care of herself, taking responsibility for her health and well-being, and we hope to have years and years yet. In any case, the more conversations she can fit engage in, the better!

Oh, one more thing- Happy Birthday Marie!

Thanks much for your participation.

From: Longfellow To: Nightingale July 4, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration.
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Santa Filomena

Poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Whene’er a noble deed is wrought,
Whene’er is spoken a noble thought,
Our hearts, in glad surprise,
To higher levels rise.

The tidal wave of deeper souls
Into our inmost being rolls,
And lifts us unawares
Out of all meaner cares.

Honor to those whose words or deeds
Thus help us in our daily needs,
And by their overflow
Raise us from what is low!

Thus thought I, as by night I read
Of the great army of the dead,
The trenches cold and damp,
The starved and frozen camp,–

The wounded from the battle-plain,
In dreary hospitals of pain,
The cheerless corridors,
The cold and stony floors.

Lo! in that house of misery
A lady with a lamp I see
Pass through the glimmering gloom,
And flit from room to room.

And slow, as in a dream of bliss,
The speechless sufferer turns to kiss
Her shadow, as it falls
Upon the darkening walls.

As if a door in heaven should be
Opened and then closed suddenly,
The vision came and went,
The light shone and was spent.

On England’s annals, through the long
Hereafter of her speech and song,
That light its rays shall cast
From portals of the past.

A Lady with a Lamp shall stand
In the great history of the land,
A noble type of good,
Heroic womanhood.

Nor even shall be wanting here
The palm, the lily, and the spear,
The symbols that of yore
Saint Filomena bore.

Meeting Challenges – Ripple Effects July 3, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
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Nursing through a lens of history.

As we celebrate the victory in battle that lead to the signing of the Declaration of Independence this weekend, my thoughts are on how often nursing is spotlighted and impacted during wartime.  A cataclysmic example of this is the lasting affect  of Florence Nightingale’s work during the battle of Crimea.

That situation was a terrible one, full of despair and unpredictability.  Florence went voluntarily into that mess  because of how desperate it was, and acted on her values, knowledge and skills to change that reality. The depth of the damage to soldiers and the impact of her reforms  set in motion a profound  reaction, which in this instance included seeds of change vastly greater in scope than that particular problem.   The death rate among hospitalized soldiers was amazingly reduced due to her reforms, and the whole country of England honored her for this achievement.

In particular, she provided compassion, and she managed the environment to a degree of sanitation that was new to that setting. The depth and cohesion of her response to that situation was beyond what anyone expected.  No one involved in that war would have  predicted or imagined that the outcome of that war would be the modern practice of nursing.

When people engage in the struggle to do their best in difficult times, positive outcomes are more likely.. not only in that moment, but decades and centuries later.

Reading List – Treasures! June 30, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
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Here are some books I’ve enjoyed and gained a great deal of insight and resources from. I’d love to hear your thoughts on these and your favorites as well!

The Power of Now by Eckhardt Tolle — I learned the incredible value of learning how to observe my thinking…..thus creating the opportunity to grasp a powerful truth.   That I am more than my thinking.   I am a whole being and by stepping away from my thinking I learn that my thoughts do not define who I am.    My being is more than my thoughts.   That awareness shifts my perspective on life.. Fascinating and exhilarating!

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult – an ambitious tackling of the racial issues of our time, through the setting of nursing.   A highly experienced black nurse is forbidden by her nurse manager from taking care of the baby of a white supremacist couple….at their insistence.   The story from there presents a dilemma for the black nurse that results in a life-changing lawsuit.

Blessed Unrest by Paul Hawken (2007) – the world is undergoing transformational  changes of people, on a  small scale – in conversational salons and discussion groups, between neighbors and friends. These group conversations are about serious topics like spirituality and the role of governments.   And he makes the point that conversations can change people and people change the world.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks  by Rebecca Skloot incredible (true) story of medical ethics involving HeLa – two dime-sized tissue samples taken from Henrietta. The cells possessed unusual qualities and yielded amazing benefits for science; the effects for Henrietta and her family were.. less. Bioethics, racial injustice, and history co-exist in this story which starts in Baltimore, involves the Tuskegee Institute, and spreads benefits globally (for specific groups and humanity in general). Talk about health care disparity – really incredible. Recognition, Justice and Healing – hopefully this book brings us a step closer to these goals.  The film, staring Oprah Winfrey, premiered on HBO this past April and will be on DVD soon!

New Historical Resources: Nightingale and Barton June 29, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Thought for today.
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I came across these resources recently, and wanted to share them.

One new thing is a collection of Florence Nightingale’s letters – being digitized, and soon available to all on the web!

The other is the Clara Baron Missing Soldiers Office, Washington DC’s newest Museum.

As we rest up after the amazing Symposium last week, it’s fun to see progress continue on the embrace of our history. I just love the trajectory of really knowing our history, having clarity about the current situation  and beng aware of future trends in society that will impact our profession.  That awareness can lead us into proactive planning, rather than the reactivity that has so often directed our responses.

Memorial Day Remembrance: Nurses Serving! May 29, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Academia, History, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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Wartime nursing is unique, but also those periods in history tend to have an outsize effect on peacetime nursing as well. During World War II for example, huge changes took place. No one wants war, but we can honor those who served. I personally find this period fascinating, and with my work with the Heritage committee at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing’s Alumni Society, have been able to delve into it with great delight. Here are a few notes on some of what took place then, creating our present moment today.

As of 1943 the US Public Health Service had already funneled $ 5.7 m into nursing education, to stem the inevitable shortage of nurses, even as they knew that amount would be insufficient.

So Frances Payne Bolton, US Rep from Ohio, set in motion the Cadet Nurse Corps which was signed in to law that year. Under that program $150m was dispersed for scholarships and direct stipends – uniformly across the country, without regard for race and ethnicity, to all nursing schools.

Not only did this result in a massive surge of paramilitary recruits (targets were met every year), but nursing schools themselves radically transformed. The program was terminated in 1948, but by then 124,000 women had been enrolled, and nursing schools – especially those serving non-white populations – took huge steps forward in the condition of their facilities and equipment.

Here in Minnesota,  Katherine J. Densford, Director of Nursing at the U of Minnesota, was another leader active during that period, serving as president of the American Nurses Association among other positions.  She worked closely with Payne Bolton and Roosevelt to help supply nurses to the front lines – the University of Minnesota School of Nursing educated 10% of all US Cadet nurses educated during that period.

Densford also determined that the lag time between when nurses completed the recruitment application and when they were actually inducted actually took 6-8 months initially. She spear-headed efforts to reduce the bureaucratic tangle and as a result that lag time was reduced down to only 4-6 weeks!

A much needed -addition to the  Powell Hall nurses dormitory was built at the University of Minnesota with  Cadet Funds, and this is where I had my office while Primary Nursing was being created.

Another tidbit I wanted to share: May 1944, the national induction ceremony was held in DC, and it was for all nurses being inducted around the country, and so it was broadcast nationally on the radio.   KSTP carried in the Twin Cities. Thousands of nurses attended the induction  in Minnesota at the Northrop auditorium. The program included a song composed for the occasion, sung by Bing Crosby.

The ‘snappy’ nurse cadet uniform was actually created by Edith Heard – a famous Hollywood costume designer.  Wearing this uniform gave Cadet nurses the same ‘perks’ given to military men and women….like free admission to movies!

This bold initiative was a vital part of the war effort, serving both the military and civilian hospital needs.   This memorial day is a good time to remember the dedicated nurses who saved the lives of soldiers on the battle field.

 

Additional resources:

U of MN School of Nursing History

Leadership at the U of MN School of Nursing

Smithsonian website for the National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center:

Salons – Looking Back, Looking Forward May 19, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership, Nursing Salons, Professional Practice.
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Alternate title: Salons – Then and Now

A Talk for All Times | Nursing Forum, October 2010

Salon conversations | Nursing NewsNurse.com | 2012

 

Nursing Salons were created to provide a safe opportunity for people from throughout the diverse practice of nursing to share their stories, hear from others, come to grips with the realities of their workplace, offer support, and regain the feeling of unity.

They caught on like wildfire, not only in the U.S. but around the world as well.

At the top of this post you’ll see some links to the birth of these Salons: my article in Nursing Forum Magazine from 2010, and a note from an early adopter in 2012.

It’s interesting to relive those initial ground-breaking moments, and review the origins of all that has come to be.

Looking forward, I hope Salons continue to spread into every community and are attended by members of  all health professions.  These conversations create ripple effects throughout the system.

Imagine if doctors and nurses and professionals from other health disciplines all over the country met together and had conversations like this. Margaret Wheatley tells us that conversations change people and people change the world.

We see this happening in ways large and small at Salons. The salon in my home yesterday evening was no exception.

My dream is that doctors and nurses and all clinicians begin meeting in homes all over the US and talk to each other about the work we do.   I KNOW the health care system would be impacted in a major way.   We would migrate health care forward, in big changes and small changes, in ways that can not be specifically predicted but can be expected with absolute certainty.

I hope that everyone is able to take part in this wonderful vehicle for self-care and enhanced professional practice. And I hope that together we continue to build the best future possible for the health of society.

Have any of you has been to a salon recently? How did it go? Are any of you still looking for one near you? Are any of you planning events and considering adding a salon before/after/during? It’s always great to hear from you!

Reading List:

Turning to One Another: Simple Conversations to Restore Hope to the Future (2002) Margaret Wheatley

Blast from the Past: Feisty Former Chicagoan (1978) May 13, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership, Manthey Life Mosaic, Professional Practice, Values.
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Primary Nursing: Hospitals bring back Florence Nightingale

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This article was one of the first in mainstream media about Primary Nursing, Marie Manthey .. and Florence Nightingale!

The picture on page 1 is so wonderful, isn’t it?

Here are some excerpts from the article, which you can see directly via the links at the top of this post.

“We’re not just dealing with inert lumps of flesh that hurt” Davis says. “We’re dealing with people’s emotional well-being, too. And that’s what makes nursing exciting again.”

Chicago Tribune: Sunday, February 2, 1978

by Joan Zyda

Sometime after World War II, the American registered nurse was forced into being less like Florence Nightingale and more like a factory foreman.

The shortage of nurses resulted in assembly-line nursing, which brought with it an assortment of nameless, often uncaring persons who trained for brief periods before being turned loose on patients. They were practical nurses, vocational nurses, technicians, orderlies, nurse’s aides, and nursing assistants.

If you’ve been in a hospital in the lst three decades, you have seen this production line in action. Somebody took your temperature, somebody else gave you a bath, somebody else took your blod pressure, somebody else brought in your food tray, somebody else …

Conducting this “orchestra” was, and still is, the chief duty of the registered nurse in most hospitals. Despite years of learning to care for sick people, she ends up in a supervisory job that takes her out of the mainstream of patient care. If she sees patients at all, it’s only briefly when she gives them a shot or a pill, or if there’s a “problem.”

“The patients are completely perplexed and often get irritable or depressed by this fragmented and impersonal care; it frights and frustrates the doctors; the morale of nurses sinks to an incredible low, resulting in a high turnover rate and absenteeism; and it has caused a decline in patient care at many hospitals,” says Dr. William Shaffrrath, diretor of the National Joint Practice Commission in Chicago.

The commission was set up in 1972 by the American Medical Association and the American Nurses Association to solve the growing dissatisfaction with hospital nursing care.

Teh solution, with which the commission has been shaking the pillars of medicine, is to put the registered nurse back at the patient’s bedside, where she can use her training. Some hospitals have already done this, including Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center, University of Chicago Hospitals, Good Samaritan Hospital in Downers Grove, and Evanston Hospital.

“Most nurses we talked to are frustrated. They don’t want to be supervisors,” Schaffrath says. “They prefer hands-on nursing in the Florence Nightingale tradition. They want to walk cot to cot, tending to and cheering on the patients.”

Schaffrath credits Marie Manthey, 42, a fiesty former Chicagoan and now vice president of patient services at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut, for blowing the whistle on nursing. She has advocated for the “return to the bedside” alternative in articles in several prominent medical journals.

As a registered nurse for 22 years, Manthey has had an inside look at the failings of her profession.

“Registered nurses have become faceless people, and it’s the system’s fault,” she says. “Nursing has become extremely production-oriented with very little concern for human needs. Most nurses are embarrassed about that. They say, almost apologetically, ‘Well, I’m just a staff nurse,’ which equates to, ‘I’m just a housewife.’

“But if nurses got their identity back,” Manthey says, “they’d be a proud people again. Then they’d be saying, ‘Hey, wait a minute. I am a staff nurse. I am an important person.”

“Nurses are supposed to be in the thick of things,” Manthey says firmly.

Manthey has coined her remedy, “Primary Nursing” a system whose main goal is just that — to get the nurse to provide total nursing care to a patient during their hospitalization. That means the same nurse does all the work for a patient from admission to discharge.

“The Nurse and the Patient get to know each other,” Manthey says.

With Primary Nursing, the nurse takes over many tasks she used to assign her aides.. because they’re all relevant to patient care.”

/ end content on front page of article, clip 1of2

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For further content from this article, see clipping number 2, and/or let us know if you’d like us to post further excerpts here.

Isn’t it amazing to look back and remember the days when Nursing was at that factory-process level??

What Would Nightingale Do? May 12, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership.
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Happy birthday, Florence Nightingale!

Florence’s life and career continue to be an inspiration for Nursing as well as leaders in general. She was an extraordinary strategist who had powerful insights into organizational dynamics. Facing a challenge, she would assess the pockets of power, align herself with strong allies, and convince people that a solution to the problem would be found.

She was able to make tough choices, including letting some things go until they had to be fixed.

I’m reminded of the story of her arrival in Crimea. The British Military Surgeons refused to let her enter the hospital. They did not want to deal with a “do-gooder” … and a lady at that.

The fact that she arrived with a ship fully loaded with medical supplies, dressings, bedding, food, clothing, etc. gave her the leverage she needed.

She responded to their refusal to let her enter the hospital by refusing to allow the ship to be unloaded. For some days it sat in the harbor with desperately needed medicine, equipment and supplies — until finally surgeons changed their minds and invited her and her nurses to come work in the hospital. It seems clear to me that during those days the ship was in the harbor, there were patients who suffered because they didn’t have the food and medicine on the ship.

The lesson I take from this is that the strategy of letting a failing system fail might be better than the situation-by-situation “fixes” nurses engage in, which take them away from the patient.   Complex systems call for systems-based solutions.  Strategy is important.

We need the courage of Nightingale to focus our energy where it will be best used for patient care now, as she did back then.

Richard Olding Beard: An Extraordinary Feminist. May 7, 2017

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This note is about a work-in-progress, a scratch pad entry from the Desk of Marie Manthey.. it includes a resource list at the end and an invitation to comment and join in the process!

Nursing and the Women’s Movement have had an interesting, challenging and contradictory relationship since modern nursing was born around the 1870’s.

Never a feminist herself, Florence Nightingale created a profession for nurses – for women – where none had existed before. This profession is based on values that have been associated with women.

Fast forward 40 years to the life of Richard Olding Beard, a professor of physiology in the University of Minnesota Medical School. His strong vision of the contribution nursing could make to the benefit of society gave the school of nursing a trajectory that continues to compel the future.

He founded the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota, which was the first nursing education program within an academic institution. He clearly supported higher education for women and recognized the foundation of science in nursing. He presciently imbued the School of Nursing with multiple societal values that continue to be expressed in the work of its graduates today. Richard Olding Beard saw Nursing’s potential capacity for increasing social justice in the world; for example because of how nursing values the act of caring for the sick – all of them – without regard for position, wealth or status.

There is much more to come, in the full article. To end this preview, here is one of my favorite quotes of his:

“The history of a university or school – and particularly of a professional school – may be guided or misguided by its governing body, may be inspired or uninspired by its faculty, but it is actually written in the work and in the play, in the life and character, in the future achievements and influence of its students.” R. O. Beard, Graduation of the School of Nursing, September 1923.

Beard’s writings (articles mainly) have been a treasure trove for me, and I encourage you to check them out. There is a collection of his writings at the Anderson Archives at the University of Minnesota Library.

Additional information: Honoring the Past, Creating the Future – School of Nursing Celebrates a Century of Leadership. Minnesota Nursing, Spring/Summer 2009. P 2-3.

Please comment below with any questions, thoughts, anecdotes etc..!