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From: Longfellow To: Nightingale July 4, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration.
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Santa Filomena

Poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Whene’er a noble deed is wrought,
Whene’er is spoken a noble thought,
Our hearts, in glad surprise,
To higher levels rise.

The tidal wave of deeper souls
Into our inmost being rolls,
And lifts us unawares
Out of all meaner cares.

Honor to those whose words or deeds
Thus help us in our daily needs,
And by their overflow
Raise us from what is low!

Thus thought I, as by night I read
Of the great army of the dead,
The trenches cold and damp,
The starved and frozen camp,–

The wounded from the battle-plain,
In dreary hospitals of pain,
The cheerless corridors,
The cold and stony floors.

Lo! in that house of misery
A lady with a lamp I see
Pass through the glimmering gloom,
And flit from room to room.

And slow, as in a dream of bliss,
The speechless sufferer turns to kiss
Her shadow, as it falls
Upon the darkening walls.

As if a door in heaven should be
Opened and then closed suddenly,
The vision came and went,
The light shone and was spent.

On England’s annals, through the long
Hereafter of her speech and song,
That light its rays shall cast
From portals of the past.

A Lady with a Lamp shall stand
In the great history of the land,
A noble type of good,
Heroic womanhood.

Nor even shall be wanting here
The palm, the lily, and the spear,
The symbols that of yore
Saint Filomena bore.

Meeting Challenges – Ripple Effects July 3, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
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Nursing through a lens of history.

As we celebrate the victory in battle that lead to the signing of the Declaration of Independence this weekend, my thoughts are on how often nursing is spotlighted and impacted during wartime.  A cataclysmic example of this is the lasting affect  of Florence Nightingale’s work during the battle of Crimea.

That situation was a terrible one, full of despair and unpredictability.  Florence went voluntarily into that mess  because of how desperate it was, and acted on her values, knowledge and skills to change that reality. The depth of the damage to soldiers and the impact of her reforms  set in motion a profound  reaction, which in this instance included seeds of change vastly greater in scope than that particular problem.   The death rate among hospitalized soldiers was amazingly reduced due to her reforms, and the whole country of England honored her for this achievement.

In particular, she provided compassion, and she managed the environment to a degree of sanitation that was new to that setting. The depth and cohesion of her response to that situation was beyond what anyone expected.  No one involved in that war would have  predicted or imagined that the outcome of that war would be the modern practice of nursing.

When people engage in the struggle to do their best in difficult times, positive outcomes are more likely.. not only in that moment, but decades and centuries later.

Reading List – Treasures! June 30, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
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Here are some books I’ve enjoyed and gained a great deal of insight and resources from. I’d love to hear your thoughts on these and your favorites as well!

The Power of Now by Eckhardt Tolle — I learned the incredible value of learning how to observe my thinking…..thus creating the opportunity to grasp a powerful truth.   That I am more than my thinking.   I am a whole being and by stepping away from my thinking I learn that my thoughts do not define who I am.    My being is more than my thoughts.   That awareness shifts my perspective on life.. Fascinating and exhilarating!

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult – an ambitious tackling of the racial issues of our time, through the setting of nursing.   A highly experienced black nurse is forbidden by her nurse manager from taking care of the baby of a white supremacist couple….at their insistence.   The story from there presents a dilemma for the black nurse that results in a life-changing lawsuit.

Blessed Unrest by Paul Hawken (2007) – the world is undergoing transformational  changes of people, on a  small scale – in conversational salons and discussion groups, between neighbors and friends. These group conversations are about serious topics like spirituality and the role of governments.   And he makes the point that conversations can change people and people change the world.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks  by Rebecca Skloot incredible (true) story of medical ethics involving HeLa – two dime-sized tissue samples taken from Henrietta. The cells possessed unusual qualities and yielded amazing benefits for science; the effects for Henrietta and her family were.. less. Bioethics, racial injustice, and history co-exist in this story which starts in Baltimore, involves the Tuskegee Institute, and spreads benefits globally (for specific groups and humanity in general). Talk about health care disparity – really incredible. Recognition, Justice and Healing – hopefully this book brings us a step closer to these goals.  The film, staring Oprah Winfrey, premiered on HBO this past April and will be on DVD soon!

New Historical Resources: Nightingale and Barton June 29, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Thought for today.
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I came across these resources recently, and wanted to share them.

One new thing is a collection of Florence Nightingale’s letters – being digitized, and soon available to all on the web!

The other is the Clara Baron Missing Soldiers Office, Washington DC’s newest Museum.

As we rest up after the amazing Symposium last week, it’s fun to see progress continue on the embrace of our history. I just love the trajectory of really knowing our history, having clarity about the current situation  and beng aware of future trends in society that will impact our profession.  That awareness can lead us into proactive planning, rather than the reactivity that has so often directed our responses.

About a Paradox June 25, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Professional Practice.
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On CHCM‘s recent publication – ‘Advancing Relationship-Based Cultures’ by Mary Koloroutis and David Abelson.

This book was just released in the last few weeks, and was given out to all attendees of the International Relationship-Based Care Symposium.

Here is the first line of its ‘Epilogue:

‘It is a paradox that our work includes so many painful elements of the human experience and still ends up being, somehow, profoundly beautiful.’

That is a sentence I read when I first saw a preliminary draft of the book. I said to my colleague who I had borrowed it from: ‘Oh, this is so beautiful – it makes me want to cry.’

As I went on to read the rest of the paragraph, I was filled with awe at the authenticity and practicality used in the writing process.

The rest of the paragraph goes like this:

‘That contradiction is a lot for any one person to hold. It’s even more for a person to effectively make sense of it, to sort it out – to reconcile the paradox of it. Not very many of us can do that kind of reconciling in isolation.

 

Subsequently: RBC Symposium Day 4_ Thursday, June 22 June 23, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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Collective process and action were the agenda for this amazing day!

Robin Youngson started off the day leading a session around the impact of compassion on the healing process.   He shared compelling scientific data on that impact, driving home the point that compassion GREATLY impacts healing.   It is hard to imagine any justification for not being intentionally compassionate.   It does not involve the use of time….just the use of heart and brain.

Another powerful event was an inter-professional conversation of young clinicians on  their work and their ideas about a better future for health care.   This was a ‘fishbowl’ type of event where they sat in the middle of the room on a raised dias, with the audience sitting around them…..listening to their conversation.   A stunning event….there is so much to learn from each other.

Culminating today’s events, David Cooperrider explained  the well-known Appreciative Inquiry (AI) methodology; and utilized that to lead participants through a synergistic process that focused on what people do right – instead of focusing just on problems.

Conference participants continually comment on the magnificence of this conference, how it is changing the way they feel and think and how grateful they are to be able to attend.

 

 

Celebrating books: ‘Should’ – taking back your power over words [to post whenever too busy for notes!] June 23, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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In the midst of all the Symposium goings-on, we wanted to take a minute and celebrate the work of one of our CHCM staff member, Rebecca Smith. At CHCM she is involved in all the writing activities of the company, and also consults in the area of human communication/relationships.

Creative Health Care Management last year re-issued Rebecca’s book: ‘Should: How Habits of Language Shape Our Lives‘, due to its very useful applicability to the health care environment.

In ‘Should’, Rebecca explores the power of language at a psychological level – the power it has to hold us back or to move us forward. It is another non-silo work, applicable to everyone in every part of their life. Including, of course, nurses.

I had the privilege of providing the foreward for the 2016 edition and here’s an excerpt from that:

‘The culture of nursing is replete with all forms of oppression, but I have always thought that the most insidious among them is self-oppression, often referred to as victim mentality. There is no question that our work is hard or that there is, and will always be, more work to do than time or resources to do it. In fact, it is no mystery why people in all disciplines within health care might slip into feeling victimized or oppressed.

But that doesn’t mean self-oppression and victim mentality are the only choices available to us.

Self-empowerment — the opposite of self-oppression — is possible for all people in all circumstances (remember how self-empowered Nelson Mandela became during his time in prison!), and just as the name implies, it happens from the inside out. It happens because of the decisions we make to empower ourselves, and one of the most direct routes to doing so comes through noticing and changing the language we use to describe our lives. If our language is full of references to our own powerlessness, what kinds of stories do we end up telling ourselves about who we are, what we do, and how much we matter?

Part conceptual, part workbook, this work is full of concrete, applicable ideas. If you’ve already read Rebecca’s book, we’d love to hear about your experiences with her ideas. Otherwise we strongly encourage you to pick up a copy for your self-empowerment library!

 

As it happens: RBC Symposium Day 3_ Wednesday, June 21 June 21, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
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This is the busiest day of the CHCM International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, so to keep the posts from getting too long, will be sharing snippets & segments!

Launched by the wonderful Keynote by Lois Swope on compassionate care; with an all-attendee mid-day session on relationship-building in Indian Health from Phoenix Indian Medical Center; and concluding with a Poster Session; the day also included two breakout sessions with 5 choices each of those sessions! (Please join me in thanking the CHCM staff, they’ve been working extremely hard to bring this all together!)

As it happens: RBC Symposium Day 2_ Tuesday, June 20 June 20, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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Today is the first official day of the 2017 International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, here in Minneapolis at the Hilton Minneapolis! Read on for notes, hand-out links and inside peeks into Day 2.

The MusicParadigm experience made a huge impression on me when I first took it in, several years ago. I told everyone I talked to about it for weeks! It is such a unique,  substantively clear demonstration of the clear power of positive leadership. If you are experiencing it with us today, I would love to hear what you think of it! Otherwise I hope you catch it as soon as you’re able.

I’ve written about The James previously on this blog – along with UC-Davis they hold a pre-eminent position in US critical care health care systems for their extensive and inspired implementation of Relationship-Based Care.

1.Hosp, 6.Doors, 60.Wards   – Such an amazing presentation, from a multi-site hospital in Italian-speaking Switzerland; implementing Relationship-Based Care – escaping silo’s and nurturing compassionate care.

Theory without Practice is empty and Practice without Theory is Blind – Emmanuel Kant

Next was a presentation from the CNO and the CMO about how they’re partnering at Pennsylvania Hospital,  and creating an extraordinarily healthy culture there.  The day ended with a  delightful vocal experience of Full Voice lead byBarbara McAfee!

As it happens: RBC Symposium Day 1 June 19, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Manthey Life Mosaic, Professional Practice, Values.
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Today is the pre-conference afternoon of the 2017 International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, here in Minneapolis at the Hilton Minneapolis!

Here are links to the handout materials available at this time:

Gratitude_Human_Connection

DeepenFacilitationCapacity

It’s been great already to have a brunch at my home – to which I invited international guests, several local nursing leaders and CHCM consultants. Conversations ranged over various topics including comparisons between people’s situations in different countries.

The conference itself is a very enthusiastic experience! I have been constantly in motion and it’s wonderful. Everyone is very happy to be here and many are saying ‘this is exactly what we need at our hospital!’

This afternoon I was able to be a surprise guest at the Daisy Foundation session. I spoke about the the impact of Florence Marie Fisher coloring in my coloring book, and also what a wonderful thing it was for me to be able to nominate her for the DAISY award. In closing I brought in Florence Nightingale as well.

I enjoy talking about the power of nursing: as I experienced in my lifetime the impact of my nurse when I was five years old.  I like to make it clear that the work that I’ve been involved in leading is directly the result of Florence Marie Fisher coloring in my coloring book.

I don’t think that that concept can possibly be emphasized too strongly: the power of good nursing care!

Much more to come, looking forward to sharing it with all of you!