jump to navigation

A Core Value: Humanization of Patients July 20, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Manthey Life Mosaic, Professional Practice, Values.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

Many many years ago I was being pressesd to articulate my deepest passion about Nursing.   Specifically,  what did I believe is the fundamental core value of the nursing profession?     After thinking about it deeply, I came up with a deep believe that  our most important role is to facilitate the humanization of patient care,…. which required that we first humanize the experience, practice and focus of nurses.   Nurses cannot humanize patient care unless they are empowered in their role and in practice.  Humanization of health care for patients  means  engagement of patients and their families in decisions about treatment choices, as well as end of life choices.    This ultimate exercise of free will is the pathway to fulfillment as a human….and the restriction of free will is dehumanizing.

I see this goal  becoming closer to reality in many situations, thanks to nursing’s incredible advances, as well as to advances in technology and  many other societal advances.   However,  I think much work is still needed to promote nursing’s role as patient advocates for their greater involvement in decisions.  The culture change we seek is to humanize patient care.   Nurses must support patients ability to accept responsibility for themselves, and to exercise their own  free will about their treatment and their lives, knowledgeable about the options that are available to them.

Empowered nurses are needed to empower their patients.

Whether the setting is an ICU unit, a Neo-Natal unit, or even hospice. Empowered nurses can make sure the patients and their families have all the necessary information to make their own life decisions – about end of life, or about courses of treatment – and that they are empowered to do so.

The change is coming.   Let’s make sure the nursing profession is ready to fully engage in the humanization of health care. The public is more ready than the health care system.

Happy Birthday Marie! July 17, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, History, Inspiration, Leadership, Manthey Life Mosaic, Nursing Peer Support Network, Nursing Salons, Professional Practice, Thought for today, Values.
Tags: , , , , ,
13 comments

This is Claire talking (Marie’s daughter, and co-editor of this site), checking in with you on this celebratory day!

I know Marie values each and every one of you, and loves hearing from you and having conversations with you – whether in person, in various professional / civic roles, on social media, here on the blog.

And so today on her birthday, I wanted to formally welcome you all back to this blog.

In the last few months, we’ve started to get active again — exploring various kinds of posts with a multitude of topics including Nursing: it’s history, challenges, future, best practices, values & inspiration etc.. as well as CHCM activities, Marie’s life (Mosaic), Nursing Salons, the Nursing Peer Support Network, activities at the University of MN School of Nursing, and so on.

If you have a moment today, would love to hear any preferences from you about types of content, questions you have for Marie, how often you’d like us to post, how you’d like to hear about posts, and anything else to make this blog a win-win.

We never know how long any of us have here. Marie is the epitome of taking care of herself, taking responsibility for her health and well-being, and we hope to have years and years yet. In any case, the more conversations she can fit engage in, the better!

Oh, one more thing- Happy Birthday Marie!

Thanks much for your participation.

About a Paradox June 25, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Professional Practice.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

On CHCM‘s recent publication – ‘Advancing Relationship-Based Cultures’ by Mary Koloroutis and David Abelson.

This book was just released in the last few weeks, and was given out to all attendees of the International Relationship-Based Care Symposium.

Here is the first line of its ‘Epilogue:

‘It is a paradox that our work includes so many painful elements of the human experience and still ends up being, somehow, profoundly beautiful.’

That is a sentence I read when I first saw a preliminary draft of the book. I said to my colleague who I had borrowed it from: ‘Oh, this is so beautiful – it makes me want to cry.’

As I went on to read the rest of the paragraph, I was filled with awe at the authenticity and practicality used in the writing process.

The rest of the paragraph goes like this:

‘That contradiction is a lot for any one person to hold. It’s even more for a person to effectively make sense of it, to sort it out – to reconcile the paradox of it. Not very many of us can do that kind of reconciling in isolation.

 

Subsequently: RBC Symposium Day 4_ Thursday, June 22 June 23, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
Tags: , , , , ,
add a comment

Collective process and action were the agenda for this amazing day!

Robin Youngson started off the day leading a session around the impact of compassion on the healing process.   He shared compelling scientific data on that impact, driving home the point that compassion GREATLY impacts healing.   It is hard to imagine any justification for not being intentionally compassionate.   It does not involve the use of time….just the use of heart and brain.

Another powerful event was an inter-professional conversation of young clinicians on  their work and their ideas about a better future for health care.   This was a ‘fishbowl’ type of event where they sat in the middle of the room on a raised dias, with the audience sitting around them…..listening to their conversation.   A stunning event….there is so much to learn from each other.

Culminating today’s events, David Cooperrider explained  the well-known Appreciative Inquiry (AI) methodology; and utilized that to lead participants through a synergistic process that focused on what people do right – instead of focusing just on problems.

Conference participants continually comment on the magnificence of this conference, how it is changing the way they feel and think and how grateful they are to be able to attend.

 

 

Celebrating books: ‘Should’ – taking back your power over words [to post whenever too busy for notes!] June 23, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

In the midst of all the Symposium goings-on, we wanted to take a minute and celebrate the work of one of our CHCM staff member, Rebecca Smith. At CHCM she is involved in all the writing activities of the company, and also consults in the area of human communication/relationships.

Creative Health Care Management last year re-issued Rebecca’s book: ‘Should: How Habits of Language Shape Our Lives‘, due to its very useful applicability to the health care environment.

In ‘Should’, Rebecca explores the power of language at a psychological level – the power it has to hold us back or to move us forward. It is another non-silo work, applicable to everyone in every part of their life. Including, of course, nurses.

I had the privilege of providing the foreward for the 2016 edition and here’s an excerpt from that:

‘The culture of nursing is replete with all forms of oppression, but I have always thought that the most insidious among them is self-oppression, often referred to as victim mentality. There is no question that our work is hard or that there is, and will always be, more work to do than time or resources to do it. In fact, it is no mystery why people in all disciplines within health care might slip into feeling victimized or oppressed.

But that doesn’t mean self-oppression and victim mentality are the only choices available to us.

Self-empowerment — the opposite of self-oppression — is possible for all people in all circumstances (remember how self-empowered Nelson Mandela became during his time in prison!), and just as the name implies, it happens from the inside out. It happens because of the decisions we make to empower ourselves, and one of the most direct routes to doing so comes through noticing and changing the language we use to describe our lives. If our language is full of references to our own powerlessness, what kinds of stories do we end up telling ourselves about who we are, what we do, and how much we matter?

Part conceptual, part workbook, this work is full of concrete, applicable ideas. If you’ve already read Rebecca’s book, we’d love to hear about your experiences with her ideas. Otherwise we strongly encourage you to pick up a copy for your self-empowerment library!

 

As it happens: RBC Symposium Day 3_ Wednesday, June 21 June 21, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

This is the busiest day of the CHCM International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, so to keep the posts from getting too long, will be sharing snippets & segments!

Launched by the wonderful Keynote by Lois Swope on compassionate care; with an all-attendee mid-day session on relationship-building in Indian Health from Phoenix Indian Medical Center; and concluding with a Poster Session; the day also included two breakout sessions with 5 choices each of those sessions! (Please join me in thanking the CHCM staff, they’ve been working extremely hard to bring this all together!)

As it happens: RBC Symposium Day 2_ Tuesday, June 20 June 20, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Today is the first official day of the 2017 International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, here in Minneapolis at the Hilton Minneapolis! Read on for notes, hand-out links and inside peeks into Day 2.

The MusicParadigm experience made a huge impression on me when I first took it in, several years ago. I told everyone I talked to about it for weeks! It is such a unique,  substantively clear demonstration of the clear power of positive leadership. If you are experiencing it with us today, I would love to hear what you think of it! Otherwise I hope you catch it as soon as you’re able.

I’ve written about The James previously on this blog – along with UC-Davis they hold a pre-eminent position in US critical care health care systems for their extensive and inspired implementation of Relationship-Based Care.

1.Hosp, 6.Doors, 60.Wards   – Such an amazing presentation, from a multi-site hospital in Italian-speaking Switzerland; implementing Relationship-Based Care – escaping silo’s and nurturing compassionate care.

Theory without Practice is empty and Practice without Theory is Blind – Emmanuel Kant

Next was a presentation from the CNO and the CMO about how they’re partnering at Pennsylvania Hospital,  and creating an extraordinarily healthy culture there.  The day ended with a  delightful vocal experience of Full Voice lead byBarbara McAfee!

As it happens: RBC Symposium Day 1 June 19, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Manthey Life Mosaic, Professional Practice, Values.
Tags: , , , , , ,
add a comment

Today is the pre-conference afternoon of the 2017 International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, here in Minneapolis at the Hilton Minneapolis!

Here are links to the handout materials available at this time:

Gratitude_Human_Connection

DeepenFacilitationCapacity

It’s been great already to have a brunch at my home – to which I invited international guests, several local nursing leaders and CHCM consultants. Conversations ranged over various topics including comparisons between people’s situations in different countries.

The conference itself is a very enthusiastic experience! I have been constantly in motion and it’s wonderful. Everyone is very happy to be here and many are saying ‘this is exactly what we need at our hospital!’

This afternoon I was able to be a surprise guest at the Daisy Foundation session. I spoke about the the impact of Florence Marie Fisher coloring in my coloring book, and also what a wonderful thing it was for me to be able to nominate her for the DAISY award. In closing I brought in Florence Nightingale as well.

I enjoy talking about the power of nursing: as I experienced in my lifetime the impact of my nurse when I was five years old.  I like to make it clear that the work that I’ve been involved in leading is directly the result of Florence Marie Fisher coloring in my coloring book.

I don’t think that that concept can possibly be emphasized too strongly: the power of good nursing care!

Much more to come, looking forward to sharing it with all of you!

 

 

RAA Part III – Achieving Full Experience of Will Power June 15, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Manthey Life Mosaic.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
add a comment
This is part III of an initial series of articles about RAA. Here are links to the previous parts:

RAA Part I

RAA Part II

 

After 10 years of experience applying these ideas to professional roles and organizational structures, I began thinking about them in relation to my own life.

By this time one thing I knew for sure was that when nurses accepted responsibility for the Primary Nursing (PN) role, they experienced empowerment and manifested less victim behavior than before…..and much less than those who’s did not accept responsibility.

I also knew for sure that accepting responsibility was an experiential activity……not an intellectual activity.   You can’t just think you are responsible….you have to experience it, to literally place yourself in the position of being responsible, in order to have full access to legitimate authority.

In PN, this only seemed to occur when the nurse established a responsibility relationship with the patient.   The explicit establishment of that relationship was necessary in order for the nurse to experience responsibility acceptance. The closed door of power (personal or other) only opens when an individual experientially recognizes their responsibility.

So, my epiphany moment occurred when I asked myself the question of whether or not I had accepted responsibility for my life.

I immediately remembered with resentment areas of my life where I felt victimized.   My ex-husband, a former boss….etc.   With great clarity I knew that if I had truly accepted responsibility for all aspects of my life, I would not feel victimized by past events. As this thought process evolved, I recognized that accepting responsibility for one’s own life involves the three major components of behavior: thinking, feeling and acting.

So, accepting responsibility for my thinking meant I had to develop new thought processes.  Often, my thinking fell into automatic pathways developed over the passage of life.   These pathways needed to be examined and in many cases changed, as they led directly to victim thinking.

The new thinking required the development of new neuron pathways, and then also lots of deliberate practice until consciousness of choice became my automatic thought process in response to situations and events in my life. This involved learning to make space in my reactions to events and people for the experience of choice.

Likewise, accepting responsibility for my feelings meant I had to learn some skills for handling feelings in an appropriate way which also often involved changing the way I think.   The connection between thinking and feeling began to be more manageable. Further, accepting responsibility for my actions helped me recognize the connection between thinking and acting and how action can positively influence thinking and feeling.

This overall development required me to develop new ways of being in my life, and the results have been increased positive energy, increased choices, and increased well-being.

Role of Nurse Manager: Needs Support to be Supportive June 13, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Leadership, Professional Practice, Uncategorized.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

I’m reminded frequently about how strongly a leader’s influence drives the quality of work done…on nursing units and in every workplace.  The clarity of role definitions in the workplace – and in particular how the role of the leader is defined – is essential to effective leadership.

Leadership is often confused with limitless power.  Unclear scopes of responsibility for leaders and others creates confusion, unsatisfactory outcomes and personal stress among workers which in most cases results in bad outcomes.   This seemingly simple element is often the culprit of toxic work environments.

Leaders Empower Staff – that is the name of a basic curriculum component of CHCM’s work, and it’s also a phrase which sums up  much of our leadership philosophy and seminar focus.

We believe that the people who do the work should be empowered to make  decisions about the work, and good leaders actively support that by intentionally putting that power in the hands of their staff.

There are many specific skills and practices that need to be in place for the leader to do that and to support that structure. One of our accompanying basic beliefs is this: nobody walks in to a leadership role with everything already in place to be successful. Each new leader will have some parts of the skills set, and they’ll need to gain the rest on the job.

Each time a new leader is hired, there needs to be a systemic process of determining what they need to be successful in that role, and to provide the training, support, skills development, mentoring, etc.. necessary in order for them to grow in to that role.

Otherwise, insecure, ill-prepared leaders may assume that empowered staff are a threat to their authority and therefore to their success.   These leaders …at all levels in a hierarchy…..will hold on to power  to feel secure. Staff then are hindered from contributing at their highest level, restrained from using their actual knowledge and skill, and devalued within the workplace.  Morale is negatively affected.

Staff  need to be developed professionally so that they are confident and comfortable using their legitimate power.  Within their scope of responsibility, they need to learn how to identify operational problems, to generate solutions, to implement the solutions.  This level of employee engagement is a dream scene for most executives.

Both staff and leadership need to accept the fact that as humans, they’ll make mistakes, and that those mistakes are to be treated as opportunities for growth, not punishment. Integral to that is for leadership to actually react that way to mistakes!

Leaders do constantly need to bring their best selves to the job, to actively create for themselves a goal behavior pattern based on best leadership practices, and do their best to live up to those goals.

Accountability is crucial.

In some workplaces – within healthcare and outside of it – the accountability of leaders is sometimes problematic.  It is easy for leaders to obfuscate personnel problems, particularly if they don’t know how to or don’t want to deal with them..   The obfuscation may show up as being able to provide assurance to those they report to that staff are fine, operations are fine, progress towards goals is happening, the ship is tip-top. They may not  share sufficient detail about problem employees, hence  obfuscating their own responsibility to act, resulting in avoiding personal accountability as  leaders.   A great deal of the angst, stress and toxicity in workplaces today is due to inadequately prepared  leaders who are not held accountable for learning the basic skills necessary to create a culture of safety and empowerment.

Our values, principles and practices of Creative Health Care Management focus on changing workplace  cultures so that all members of the team (starting with the leader) have the support they need to produce efficient and effective productivity. The clear allocation of responsibility coupled with the delegation of commensurate authority and accountability are the key components to leadership and management success in every workplace.

The Nurse Managers who gain these leadership skills are the MOST essential element to creating a relationship-based environment that is healing for both the staff who work there and the patients who receive care there.