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Salon Update – Wednesday, July 19 – Draft July 21, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Leadership, Nursing Salons.
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The salon recently at my home was one of the best… which is what we always seem to say as we are checking out.

I’m often asked the ideal size of a salon, and I’ve come to the conclusion that something between 10 and 15 is just about right.

Having said that, I have had wonderful conversations with just 2 or 3, and I’ve facilitatated mass salons simultaneously for about 180 people seated at round tables at the TX nurses assn. delegates meeting. The excitement, enthusiasm and utter joy experienced during the checkout of all the groups was absolutely magnificient.

So, size for a salon is a moving target and should never be a determining factor on whether to hold one or not. If a group is very large – say 30 or more – it is entirely possible to have them divided in to two salons that meet simultaneously.

A further word about Wednesday night’s salon: it was truly inter-disciplinary, as so many are now. There were occupational therapists, a social worker, a physician, and the rest were nurses from such far-ranging occupations as a forensic-health medical examining nurse, a faculty member, a nurse executive, and staff nurses from different places working in different specialties. Truly eclectic yet the conversation was totally congruent in values and in the experiences of being a health care practitioner.

Reading List – Treasures! June 30, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
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Here are some books I’ve enjoyed and gained a great deal of insight and resources from. I’d love to hear your thoughts on these and your favorites as well!

The Power of Now by Eckhardt Tolle — I learned the incredible value of learning how to observe my thinking…..thus creating the opportunity to grasp a powerful truth.   That I am more than my thinking.   I am a whole being and by stepping away from my thinking I learn that my thoughts do not define who I am.    My being is more than my thoughts.   That awareness shifts my perspective on life.. Fascinating and exhilarating!

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult – an ambitious tackling of the racial issues of our time, through the setting of nursing.   A highly experienced black nurse is forbidden by her nurse manager from taking care of the baby of a white supremacist couple….at their insistence.   The story from there presents a dilemma for the black nurse that results in a life-changing lawsuit.

Blessed Unrest by Paul Hawken (2007) – the world is undergoing transformational  changes of people, on a  small scale – in conversational salons and discussion groups, between neighbors and friends. These group conversations are about serious topics like spirituality and the role of governments.   And he makes the point that conversations can change people and people change the world.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks  by Rebecca Skloot incredible (true) story of medical ethics involving HeLa – two dime-sized tissue samples taken from Henrietta. The cells possessed unusual qualities and yielded amazing benefits for science; the effects for Henrietta and her family were.. less. Bioethics, racial injustice, and history co-exist in this story which starts in Baltimore, involves the Tuskegee Institute, and spreads benefits globally (for specific groups and humanity in general). Talk about health care disparity – really incredible. Recognition, Justice and Healing – hopefully this book brings us a step closer to these goals.  The film, staring Oprah Winfrey, premiered on HBO this past April and will be on DVD soon!

Speak to Groups of People?? Never! May 21, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Manthey Life Mosaic, Nursing Salons, Professional Practice.
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Honestly, that’s how I felt in the early years of my career! The thought of speaking publicly was a nightmare.

As a student, I made a choice between the two options for my Master’s Degree based partly on which one involved less public speaking!

I was sure that speaking to large groups of people was not and would never be necessary for me – it is not a part of Nursing – and it terrified me.

I was physically affected – I’m not exaggerating – every time I had to do it for some reason.

I had nausea, I had knock-knees, I had so much static in my head that I could hardly hear my own thoughts. Every time I did it I felt like I had failed miserably, and no matter what, I would never do it again.

However, life went a different way for me.

I was part of the team that created Primary Nursing, and other people wanted to know about that process. There were two ways to communicate about it – speaking and writing. Writing took forever! The two articles we wrote in 1970 just took a really long time to put together, edit, format, get references, all of that. Then we did another article in 1973 – again, it just took a really long time. I was Chief Nurse at first one hospital and then another, and my available time was just very limited – it was really hard to fit in time for writing.

Much as I hated speaking, it was a way to deliver the information that I wanted others to know, in real time, most efficiently.

So for those initial five years of talking about Primary Nursing, it was excruciating every time. Every time I had knock knees, nausea, static in my head, the physical costs were huge. I would actually feel sick to my stomach just looking at my calendar and seeing a speaking date written on it. But I just had to go out there and do it anyway, because the importance of the message demanded it.

For me, getting up and speaking was a much more effective way to get the word out, than writing. People were curious and I wanted to let them know about Primary Nursing and its benefits for the nurse-patient relationship.  The effect Primary Nursing had on the patient’s experience – that’s what was so important. My passion about that essence of Nursing just saw no boundaries.

So, I made myself learn how to do public speaking, even though for most of the first five years, nothing got better. It was just as horrible, just as debilitating, just as uncomfortable every time as it always had been, for years on end.

Years later, little by little, it started to get better. I began to get some sense of self-confidence about it, to the point where I was actually able to look at  a speaking date on the calendar and not get terrible anxiety about it.

After that, I began slowly to not only be comfortable speaking, but to enjoy it. I began to be able to take in the visual and auditory feedback of the crowd and use that information to fine-tune my delivery. I learned how to be present with my message, and also present with the people I was delivering the message to.

And for these decades since then, speaking has been a huge positive for me. It’s still all about getting the message out – about Relationship-Based Care and other ways to enhance the nurse-patient relationship – in the best way possible.

The power of conversation is really what it all comes back to. I am engaging in a one-way conversation when I speak to audiences. I very much want for the audience to engage as well though, always. That’s why I like to speak within a schedule that allows for break-out sessions. I want folks listening to me to be able to speak with and listen to each other and me as well, and to have their experiences also be part of what is shared.

Nursing salons are another extension of that important need to connect – to hear each other and share each others’ experience.

Conversations Change People, People Change the World! – Margaret Wheatley

 

Salons – Looking Back, Looking Forward May 19, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in History, Inspiration, Leadership, Nursing Salons, Professional Practice.
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Alternate title: Salons – Then and Now

A Talk for All Times | Nursing Forum, October 2010

Salon conversations | Nursing NewsNurse.com | 2012

 

Nursing Salons were created to provide a safe opportunity for people from throughout the diverse practice of nursing to share their stories, hear from others, come to grips with the realities of their workplace, offer support, and regain the feeling of unity.

They caught on like wildfire, not only in the U.S. but around the world as well.

At the top of this post you’ll see some links to the birth of these Salons: my article in Nursing Forum Magazine from 2010, and a note from an early adopter in 2012.

It’s interesting to relive those initial ground-breaking moments, and review the origins of all that has come to be.

Looking forward, I hope Salons continue to spread into every community and are attended by members of  all health professions.  These conversations create ripple effects throughout the system.

Imagine if doctors and nurses and professionals from other health disciplines all over the country met together and had conversations like this. Margaret Wheatley tells us that conversations change people and people change the world.

We see this happening in ways large and small at Salons. The salon in my home yesterday evening was no exception.

My dream is that doctors and nurses and all clinicians begin meeting in homes all over the US and talk to each other about the work we do.   I KNOW the health care system would be impacted in a major way.   We would migrate health care forward, in big changes and small changes, in ways that can not be specifically predicted but can be expected with absolute certainty.

I hope that everyone is able to take part in this wonderful vehicle for self-care and enhanced professional practice. And I hope that together we continue to build the best future possible for the health of society.

Have any of you has been to a salon recently? How did it go? Are any of you still looking for one near you? Are any of you planning events and considering adding a salon before/after/during? It’s always great to hear from you!

Reading List:

Turning to One Another: Simple Conversations to Restore Hope to the Future (2002) Margaret Wheatley

Symposium Update! Urgency Building for this Exciting Event! May 8, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Academia, Creative Health Care Management, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
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CHCM’s International Relationship-Based Care Symposium

From Silos to Synergy: Showcasing Fierce Commitment to Extraordinary Care

June 19 – June 23, 2017

Minneapolis, MN

While people will be attending this event from around the country and around the world – some of you will be able to attend any/all days without traveling at all. CHCM Symposiums are sited in vibrant health-care communities, in order for those particular communities to have the special privilege of attending events within the comforts of home.

This post is especially for those of you who have that privilege this year!

The Relationship-Based Care Symposium is a magnificent program and since you live here, the options for
attending provide a wide range of choices. You really don’t want to miss this opportunity.  This is the first time we are offering the symposium locally to the Twin Cities community.   You can opt to attend one of the three
days…all three….or the pre- or the post- conference, or all of them.

This is a great opportunity.  Look carefully at all the speakers and you will see why you don’t want to miss this event.

Some highlights are:

* DAVID COOPERRIDER, the developer and creative thought leader of Appreciative Inquiry, a strengths-based approach to organizational change based on the best in people and their organizations
* ROGER NIERENBERG, a maestro who, with the help of a professional orchestra, provides a multi-sensory immersion experience of organizational dynamics and teaming
* ROBIN AND MEREDITH YOUNGSON, co-founders of New Zealand-based Hearts in Healthcare, which focuses on organizational strategy and movement building that’s centered on making health care more
compassionate
* THE DAISY FOUNDATION, enhancing patient care by celebrating compassionate and extraordinary nurses through meaningful recognition
* DEAN CONNIE DELANEY WILL speak on the amazing topic THE SOUL OF TECHNOLOGY!
* TEDDIE POTTER WILL FACILITATE A DIALOGUE with Robin Youngson and an interprofessional team of young clinicians on PARTNERING ACROSS GENERATIONS.

The journey forward of Primary Nursing, and it’s broader implementation as Relationship-Based Care, will be celebrated, cultivated and innovated further at this  once-in-a-lifetime event.

Symposium Registration Information

Please check out the Brochure and the website and your co-workers and professional community. To obtain the group rate please email:  rbcsymposium@metroconnections.com with the list of all attendees in your group and you will receive a registration code.

This activity is planned and implemented by the University of Minnesota, Interprofessional Continuing Education and Creative Health Care Management. In support of improving patient care, the University of Minnesota, Interprofessional Continuing Education is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

Register for the RBC Symposium today!

Please let me know any questions you have about this exciting event. We look forward to seeing all of you there!

The Mosaic of Marie Manthey’s Life April 30, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, History, Inspiration, Manthey Life Mosaic, Nursing Peer Support Network, Nursing Salons, Professional Practice, Values.
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ColoringBookCover

by Marie Manthey

I became ill at the age of 5 and was hospitalized for a month at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Chicago. It was a traumatic experience in a couple of ways. First of all, my parent’s didn’t know how to prepare me, since they had never been hospitalized themselves.. so they just said I was going to a large building. They left me there for a month, visiting twice a week, and sometimes when one or the other of them came, a very painful procedure was done involving an IM injection of their blood. As a result, I felt not only abandoned but also frightened and confused about the pain associated with their visits.

Florence Marie Fisher is the name of a nurse who cared for me. One day she sat at my bedside and colored in my coloring book. For me, that translated to ‘cared for me’ … and I decided then that I wanted my life to be about that kind of caring.

From that time on I knew I would be a nurse. I entered a hospital diploma program right after high school, and worked for the next four years as staff nurse, assistant Head Nurse, and Head Nurse. During the last of those years I started going to night classes in the community colleges .. not necessarily at first to get my degree.

I was invited to enroll in the degree program at the University of Minnesota, which was one-of-a-kind at that point. After 15 months of full-time study, I received my Bachelors degree in Nursing Administration. Soon after I was recruited into the U of M’s Masters program in Nursing Administration, in what was the last of the 3-quarter Master’s degrees.

Before finishing that degree, I was recruited by Miss Julian to be an Assistant Administrator of Special Projects. This was a new position that gave me an unbelievably valuable opportunity to learn first-hand about leadership and administration. I was able to experience directly not only organizational dynamics, but was also privileged to work with a group of administrators who used Senge’s principles of a learning organization even before he’d written ‘The Fifth Discipline.’

It was during this time that I became one of two Project Directors for Project 32 (at the University of Minnesota), a pilot program to improve hospital services from an interdisciplinary/interdepartmental perspective. This project eventually morphed in to Primary Nursing, and my career became about understanding and implementing organizational changes that result in the empowerment of employees and the accompanying development of healthy workplace cultures.

Throughout the next ten years of my life in nursing administration – first at another community hospital within the Twin Cities, and then at Yale New-Haven Hospital in Connecticut – I freely helped others with Primary Nursing.. Always accepting visitors and often speaking both locally and nationally as well as publishing as time allowed.

During this period of my career, what had been a manageable, socially acceptable level of alcohol consumption escalated in to full-blown alcoholism. There was an intervention and I entered a 6-week residential treatment program on the East Coast, and have been sober ever since.

In my first year of sobriety as I was feeling my way forward, there were no positions in Nursing Administration available to me. Instead I wrote my initial book on Primary Nursing .. and returned calls to all who had ever asked me to speak, putting out the word that I was available for speaking and consulting. The result was that Creative Nursing Management, Inc. was born, now the longest-running nurse-managed health care consulting firm in the U.S.

When I finished writing Primary Nursing, the publisher asked me who I wanted to dedicate it to.. and that had to be Florence Marie Fisher, the nurse who had colored in my coloring book when I was five. We weren’t able to contact her then, and so I gave up on that idea of actually connecting with her.

My career as a successful entrepreneur has continued ever since. Running a business was not ever something I thought I would do. I didn’t see myself as a businesswoman, but rather as a professional woman. Nevertheless, through many trials and many errors, the company grew. I often say we were successful not because of my business acumen, but rather because my work was authentic and based on real-world realities and values.

In time we grew into a multi-faceted, multi-national firm called Creative Health Care Management. I sold the firm when I turned 65 (in 2000) to the employees themselves. Now in semi-retirement (still, in 2017!) I remain involved in the important work of developing nursing practice and improving patient care.. just without the stresses and challenges inherent in leading an entrepreneurial entity.

An additional aspect of my work today involves tackling the challenge of Substance-Use Disorder. A group of us concerned with the problem of shame and stigma associated with SUD formed a Peer Support Network here in Minnesota, and we are partnering with entities involved in all aspects of the situation.

Another vitally important component of my professional life today has to do with my involvement with my alma mater. After transitioning away from day-to-day involvement in the running of CHCM, I became active in the Alumni organization at the U of M School of Nursing, and also became an adjunct faculty member there. In 1999 the University of Minnesota awarded me with an honorary doctorate, which was thrilling beyond compare. Today I am also active with the Heritage Committee at the School of Nursing, and am engaged in other ways as well with the University.

I also continue to be a part of my own and others’ Nursing Salons – a safe space for nurses in all walks of the profession to share conversations and support one another.

My ongoing interest in changing the way we think about workload and resources is part of the same picture. As healthcare incorporates more and more technology, the temptation strengthens to discard the human caring aspects.

As nursing matures as a profession, I am more convinced than ever, that the choice to care – and to express care and compassion by one’s behavior – is the absolutely correct choice nurses must make in order to continue to serve society justly.

Clinical competence must be on one side of the nursing coin, and care on the other. This is the ‘Coin of the Realm’ nurses must choose if, in fact, the covenant between nursing and society is to continue to exist.

ATTENTION: Blog Revision April 19, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Announcements, Values.
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I want to announce a new beginning here on my blog!

In coming weeks and months you will notice a much increased level of activity here! I’m bringing my daughter, Claire Stokes,  in to the operations of the blog, in her capacity as Managing Editor (previously of Primarily Nursing Journal), in order to provide you with much greater access to my career-long body of work. We will be creating and making available written content that will be a combination of completely new writing and the best of past writing, as well as the best out there of the work of others. This will culminate into a new era here on my blog. And we want to invite you to participate more as well.

We are doing this NOW for several reasons:

  • Time is passing, and I want to provide all I can that is of use to you while I have the chance
  • Challenging times call for heightened values-based activity on all our parts, and this is my way of giving what I have to the struggle
  • My daughter has availability now that I am able to take advantage of
  • I am bursting with new ideas and content that I want to share with all of you!

I am looking forward to being more in touch with all of you throughout this process. With Claire as the logistics person, I’ll be able to respond more to your comments and your requests for content also. So feel free to let me know what’s on your mind, and your responses to what we publish here and elsewhere!

Conversations Create Change November 12, 2013

Posted by mariemanthey in Nursing Salons.
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Recognition of the value of conversations to change ourselves and the world is organically spreading from the experience of Nursing Salons to using their same format and function in a variety of other settings.

I have heard of using the question “What’s on your mind about…..?” as a non-judgmental opening for wide-ranging issues.    The very openness of those questions removes constraints that might otherwise hinder creativity and deeper dialog.

I continue to be amazed at the directions the conversations take in Salons…..especially the ones where different levels of nurses from different types of settings – with vastly different role experiences – come together to talk.  And Most Surprising Fact!!!! ….they never, ever turn into bitch sessions.    I’m not exactly sure why…..but I am reporting the truth.

I’m curious… how have you seen that simple question used to stimulate a conversation?

Conversations June 16, 2011

Posted by mariemanthey in Inspiration.
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Conversations vs. discussions is an intriguing differentiation.  A discussion is often as exposition of pros and cons around an idea or an opinion, whereas conversations are an exchange of points of view between people. I think one of the reasons I like conversations so much is that I am sick and tired of people trying to persuade me to believe one thing or another. Politicians head the list and I have recently joined the No Labels initiative to support the simple idea that we need to stop labeling each other and start honest conversations about issues.

Another thing I’m sick and tired of is TV news programs. The same fact can be totally distorted by the different biases of the station. I am just as tired of CNN as I am of Fox and MSNBC.

And finally! I shop at Costco because they don’t try to persuade me by signs/displays/sale notices, etc. to but something.  They just put it out there for me to decide. I shut off commercials. I’m sick and tired of people telling me how I should think or what I should buy.

I love conversations on important topics by people who care about them. It is healing!!

The Power of Conversations May 30, 2011

Posted by mariemanthey in Nursing Salons, Professional Practice.
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Salon Resources: https://wordpress.com/page/mariesnursingsalon.wordpress.com/7

Conference:  Ways of Knowing Conversations

Over one hundred health care professionals gathered for a day of conversation about Sustainability and Spirituality in Healthcare on May 25 in St. Paul, MN. The unusual format for the day gave national experts 20 minutes for their speeches followed by  30 minutes of “table talk” among attendees with 10 minutes for audience-wide sharing.

This approach was designed to recognize the reality that the experience of attendees provides unique and expansive backgrounds within which to share understandings of the speakers content.  The buzz in the room confirmed the validity of the format.

One of the common threads of the people who attended is a deep interest in holistic approaches to healthcare. The insights shared and decisions made and shared point to the reality that, once again, conversation changes people and the lives they lead. Attendees were physicians, nurses, acupuncturists, massage therapists, counselors, etc.  Role distinctions blurred around the common interest in holistic health and the environment.

Salons were  frequently mentioned as one mechanism for these kinds of life-changing conversations.  Many people said they are interested in starting a Salon and I hope they will use this blog to share their experiences.