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Symposium Review – from Renata Tewes July 28, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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Professor Dr. Renata Tewes of Dresden, Germany was one of our international attendees at the Relationship-Based Care Symposium last month. 

Here are some thoughts she shared with us about the event.

What did I expect? Of course, an interesting conference, good discussions in the workshops and nice meetings with old and new colleagues during the breaks.

Nobody prepared me for what else happened on the RBC Symposium in Minneapolis. The name of the company organizing this event is Creative Health Care Management. The word creative could have been a sign, that it will not be a usual conference. It was not just interesting presentations and workshops.

It was experiencing, how it feels, when a conductor tests different leadership styles, while sitting in the middle of the orchestra. It was feeling the deep respect between a CNE and a CME while they have been explaining the importance and success of their honest relationship to each other. It was sensing the inspiring group dynamic of 400 people working with the method Appreciative Inquiry.

At the end of the conference I felt deep gratitude for being a part of this innovative process – when the participants build new relations, shared their true desires and helped in understanding – showing that building positive relationships in healthcare makes a difference. Needless to say, the empirical results of hospitals that establish Relationship-Based Care (RBC) speak for themselves.

Do I really have to wait another 4 years for the next RBC-Symposium?

Initial conversations about the next Symposium are already underway, and feedback like this is very helpful. We’d love to hear from you as well!

EVERYBODY, SOMEBODY, ANYBODY, AND NOBODY July 24, 2017

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As you know if you follow this blog, we take RAA – Responsibility, Authority and Accountability – very seriously.   We feel that that paradigm has the power to create healthy workplaces, excellent health care and healthy nurses, doctors, and staff.  Anywhere. These discussions are serious, practical, conceptual, and (we hope) useful.

Variety being the spice of life, today’s entry into the conversation is provocatively different. Today we provide to you a highly-scientific, term-by-term description (or not) of what it’s like when RAA is not in place. Anywhere. Well ok, not that scientific or academic – but highly accurate nonetheless!    Think of how often in your personal and private lives you have experienced this exact dynamic!

In this world, there are four kinds of people: EVERYBODY, SOMEBODY, ANYBODY AND NOBODY.

There was an important job to be done and EVERYBODY was asked to do it. EVERYBODY was sure that SOMEBODY would do it. ANYBODY could have done it but NOBODY did.

SOMEBODY got angry about it because it was EVERYBODY’S job. EVERYBODY thought that SOMEBODY would do it, but NOBODY realized it wouldn’t get done by ANYBODY.

It ended up that the job didn’t get done, but EVERYBODY accused SOMEBODY and NOBODY accepted responsibility.

Moral: EVERYBODY’S job is ANYBODY’S. NOBODY can be SOMEBODY unless he’s willing to do ANYBODY’S work.

How about you? All EVERYBODYs, NOBODYs, ANYBODYs, and SOMEBODYs  welcome – tell us your story.

About a Paradox June 25, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Professional Practice.
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On CHCM‘s recent publication – ‘Advancing Relationship-Based Cultures’ by Mary Koloroutis and David Abelson.

This book was just released in the last few weeks, and was given out to all attendees of the International Relationship-Based Care Symposium.

Here is the first line of its ‘Epilogue:

‘It is a paradox that our work includes so many painful elements of the human experience and still ends up being, somehow, profoundly beautiful.’

That is a sentence I read when I first saw a preliminary draft of the book. I said to my colleague who I had borrowed it from: ‘Oh, this is so beautiful – it makes me want to cry.’

As I went on to read the rest of the paragraph, I was filled with awe at the authenticity and practicality used in the writing process.

The rest of the paragraph goes like this:

‘That contradiction is a lot for any one person to hold. It’s even more for a person to effectively make sense of it, to sort it out – to reconcile the paradox of it. Not very many of us can do that kind of reconciling in isolation.

 

Subsequently: RBC Symposium Day 4_ Thursday, June 22 June 23, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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Collective process and action were the agenda for this amazing day!

Robin Youngson started off the day leading a session around the impact of compassion on the healing process.   He shared compelling scientific data on that impact, driving home the point that compassion GREATLY impacts healing.   It is hard to imagine any justification for not being intentionally compassionate.   It does not involve the use of time….just the use of heart and brain.

Another powerful event was an inter-professional conversation of young clinicians on  their work and their ideas about a better future for health care.   This was a ‘fishbowl’ type of event where they sat in the middle of the room on a raised dias, with the audience sitting around them…..listening to their conversation.   A stunning event….there is so much to learn from each other.

Culminating today’s events, David Cooperrider explained  the well-known Appreciative Inquiry (AI) methodology; and utilized that to lead participants through a synergistic process that focused on what people do right – instead of focusing just on problems.

Conference participants continually comment on the magnificence of this conference, how it is changing the way they feel and think and how grateful they are to be able to attend.

 

 

As it happens: RBC Symposium Day 3_ Wednesday, June 21 June 21, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice, Values.
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This is the busiest day of the CHCM International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, so to keep the posts from getting too long, will be sharing snippets & segments!

Launched by the wonderful Keynote by Lois Swope on compassionate care; with an all-attendee mid-day session on relationship-building in Indian Health from Phoenix Indian Medical Center; and concluding with a Poster Session; the day also included two breakout sessions with 5 choices each of those sessions! (Please join me in thanking the CHCM staff, they’ve been working extremely hard to bring this all together!)

As it happens: RBC Symposium Day 2_ Tuesday, June 20 June 20, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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Today is the first official day of the 2017 International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, here in Minneapolis at the Hilton Minneapolis! Read on for notes, hand-out links and inside peeks into Day 2.

The MusicParadigm experience made a huge impression on me when I first took it in, several years ago. I told everyone I talked to about it for weeks! It is such a unique,  substantively clear demonstration of the clear power of positive leadership. If you are experiencing it with us today, I would love to hear what you think of it! Otherwise I hope you catch it as soon as you’re able.

I’ve written about The James previously on this blog – along with UC-Davis they hold a pre-eminent position in US critical care health care systems for their extensive and inspired implementation of Relationship-Based Care.

1.Hosp, 6.Doors, 60.Wards   – Such an amazing presentation, from a multi-site hospital in Italian-speaking Switzerland; implementing Relationship-Based Care – escaping silo’s and nurturing compassionate care.

Theory without Practice is empty and Practice without Theory is Blind – Emmanuel Kant

Next was a presentation from the CNO and the CMO about how they’re partnering at Pennsylvania Hospital,  and creating an extraordinarily healthy culture there.  The day ended with a  delightful vocal experience of Full Voice lead byBarbara McAfee!

Authentic Nursing: Past, Present and Future June 18, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Manthey Life Mosaic, Professional Practice.
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Nursing is a dynamic profession, constantly moving forward for the well-being of patients and their families.

Let’s look back at one of the early mainstream articles about the onset of Primary Nursing; let’s celebrate recent exciting book releases; and let’s prepare for an incredible week of growth and discovery at the CHCM International Relationship-Based Care Symposium!!

Looking back at the Past:

Primary Nursing: Hospitals bring back Florence Nightingale

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This article provides clear details about the way things were before Primary Nursing. This excerpt (from the 2nd page) is talking about Carol Davis, Primary Nurse, who had been ‘foreman’ in a task-based nursing delivery system at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s in Chicago before the implementation of Primary Nursing there.

“I was the kingpin who cracked a whip over a crew of people who were unskilled, making sure they got their tasks done,” Davis recalls. “That kept me running around like a chicken without a head.”

She managed about a dozen or so aides, assigning them to various tasks for 25 to 40 patients. Davis made sure the chores were completed on schedule and recorded on patients’ charts, and that her workers went to lunch and returned on time.

Having her own ‘team’ was unheard of. Her aides, like chessmen, were constantly shifted around to other registered nurses, new patients, new units and new tasks. She didn’t have time to get to know her helpers and their abilities.

Furthermore, she had no time for interacting with patients except at pill time. “We were caught in a system that put procedures ahead of patients’ needs,” Davis says. “Nursing didn’t have much of a human face, yet none of us knew how to correct that.”

Results included a turnover rate of RN’s of 48.7% each year!

Celebrating the Present:

Advancing Relationship-Based Cultures is Creative Health Care Management’s newest publication, just in time for the Symposium! Edited by Mary Koloroutis, and David Abelson, the book explores the  culture of health care organizations, looks at what is  necessary for optimal outcomes, and suggests strategies to achieve those outcomes. Advancing Relationship-Based Cultures explains and expands a fundamental and often overlooked truth in health care: It is the confluence of relational and clinical competence that advances healing cultures.

Not as recent, but very relevant: Transforming Interprofessional Partnerships – A New Framework for Nursing and Partnership-Based Health Care by Riane Eisler and Teddie Potter. The only interprofessional partnership text written from the nursing perspective, it provids a model for partnership with patients and other health care professionals.

Prepare for the Future: The Symposium is Here!!!

And moving forward, the Symposium is here! Next week will be an incredible journey, which we’ll share here on the blog as much as possible.

In addition, there will be content on Twitter, Facebook, and even other channels possibly. Find me at @colormenurse on Twitter and join the conversations!

This will be an amazing event, coming only once every 4 years, and each Symposium has many dynamic, passionate health care leaders from around the world. Attendees this year are coming in from Germany, Switzerland, Brazil, Italy and with the US a large number of states are represented.

I am looking forward to seeing many of you next week and together with you working  to advance healthy workplace cultures for those receiving care, and for those who work there.

RAA Part III – Achieving Full Experience of Will Power June 15, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Manthey Life Mosaic.
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This is part III of an initial series of articles about RAA. Here are links to the previous parts:

RAA Part I

RAA Part II

 

After 10 years of experience applying these ideas to professional roles and organizational structures, I began thinking about them in relation to my own life.

By this time one thing I knew for sure was that when nurses accepted responsibility for the Primary Nursing (PN) role, they experienced empowerment and manifested less victim behavior than before…..and much less than those who’s did not accept responsibility.

I also knew for sure that accepting responsibility was an experiential activity……not an intellectual activity.   You can’t just think you are responsible….you have to experience it, to literally place yourself in the position of being responsible, in order to have full access to legitimate authority.

In PN, this only seemed to occur when the nurse established a responsibility relationship with the patient.   The explicit establishment of that relationship was necessary in order for the nurse to experience responsibility acceptance. The closed door of power (personal or other) only opens when an individual experientially recognizes their responsibility.

So, my epiphany moment occurred when I asked myself the question of whether or not I had accepted responsibility for my life.

I immediately remembered with resentment areas of my life where I felt victimized.   My ex-husband, a former boss….etc.   With great clarity I knew that if I had truly accepted responsibility for all aspects of my life, I would not feel victimized by past events. As this thought process evolved, I recognized that accepting responsibility for one’s own life involves the three major components of behavior: thinking, feeling and acting.

So, accepting responsibility for my thinking meant I had to develop new thought processes.  Often, my thinking fell into automatic pathways developed over the passage of life.   These pathways needed to be examined and in many cases changed, as they led directly to victim thinking.

The new thinking required the development of new neuron pathways, and then also lots of deliberate practice until consciousness of choice became my automatic thought process in response to situations and events in my life. This involved learning to make space in my reactions to events and people for the experience of choice.

Likewise, accepting responsibility for my feelings meant I had to learn some skills for handling feelings in an appropriate way which also often involved changing the way I think.   The connection between thinking and feeling began to be more manageable. Further, accepting responsibility for my actions helped me recognize the connection between thinking and acting and how action can positively influence thinking and feeling.

This overall development required me to develop new ways of being in my life, and the results have been increased positive energy, increased choices, and increased well-being.

Silo’s to Synergy: Symposium of Empowerment June 7, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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In my career as change leader, I have constantly paid attention to what worked – and done more of that.

I’ve paid attention to what didn’t work – and tried to avoid that in the future.

A tactic for change that I’ve long been aware of is reaching outside the bounds of one’s own work area, and making connections with people who do different kinds of work. Finding common values and shared tactics with those people whose work is different from mine. Learning from their perspective on these shared values has been invaluable.

Oftentimes people in other areas have already invented this or that wheel, that I can use to get where I’m going faster (without having to invent it myself).

Much of the literature I’ve absorbed and learned from is written for a non-nursing audience – it was written for general business usually. Or sometimes was from other areas of the health care industry.

By reaching across the distance and making connections with others who share our goals, the work we can achieve together increases exponentially.

The CHCM International Relationship-Based Care Symposium will be that process, an accredited program curated specifically for leaders who want to achieve all they can in their careers.

We hope all of you attend who are able, and for those of you who can’t we will make available the materials and information as possible. It won’t be sufficient to create the experience and the relationships gained by attending, but we’d like to expand the positive outcomes in all ways possible!

Stay tuned, and if you have been able to see your way clear to attend just recently – it’s not too late to sign up!

Learning Objectives for upcoming RBC Symposium! June 2, 2017

Posted by mariemanthey in Academia, Creative Health Care Management, Inspiration, Leadership, Professional Practice.
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Register Today for the International Relationship-Based Care Symposium, co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota School of Nursing!

From Silos to Synergy: Showcasing Fierce Commitment to Extraordinary Care

June 19-23, 2017

Join experts in compassionate care, leadership, and organized development at the 2017 International Relationship-Based Care Symposium. During this event, you will identify strategies that you and your team can use to improve interprofessional collaboration; and learn practical tools and actions to achieve committed partnerships, cross-departmental teamwork, and cultural transformation.

Accreditation

In support of improving patient care, this activity is planned and implemented by the University of Minnesota, Interprofessional Continuing Education and Creative Health Care Management. The University of Minnesota, Interprofessional Continuing Education is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

Upon completion of this activity, learners should be able to:

  • Identify how health care systems investing in Relationship-Based Care are improving interprofessional collaboration and cross-departmental teamwork.
  • Articulate how a culture grounded in mutual respect, trust, commitment, and accountability promotes well-being of patients, families, colleagues, and self.
  • Describe how all members of the health care team can experience joy and meaning in their work through full engagement and shared purpose.
  • Discuss how to cultivate a health care culture that promotes synergy between health care disciplines to bring the organization’s vision and mission to life in daily practice.
  • Identify best practices in interprofessional partnership resulting in improved health care outcomes.
  • Define ways in which technology can be a powerful vehicle for strengthening partnerships between the health care team and the patients and families they serve.

Don’t miss this exciting opportunity, we are looking forward to seeing you there!